FINDING HOME: THREE IMMIGRATION STORIES

November 10, 2019 through May 25, 2020

The immigration experience will be explored in three compelling portrayals inspired by personal experience, bringing to life the realities of traveling to, and adapting to, a new world thousands of miles away from home.

Featured will be works will include:

Crossing on Time: Steam Engines, Fast Ships, and a Journey to a New World by David Macaulay, which documents both his own family’s immigration story and the state-of-the art ship that made high-speed travel possible. David Macaulay, creator of the international bestseller The Way Things Work, brings his signature curiosity and detailing to the story of the steamship in this meticulously researched and stunningly illustrated book.

Prior to the 1800s, ships crossing the Atlantic Ocean relied on the wind in their sails to make their journeys. But invention of steam power ushered in a new era of transportation that would change ocean travel forever: the steamship. Award-winning author-illustrator David Macaulay guides readers through the fascinating history that culminated in the building of the most advanced—and last—of these steamships: the SS United States. This book artfully explores the design and construction of the ship and the life of its designer and engineer, William Francis Gibbs. Framed around the author’s own experience steaming across the Atlantic on the very same SS United StatesCrossing on Time is a tour de force of the art of explanation and a touching and surprising childhood story.

An award-winning author and artist who has helped us to understand the workings of everything from simple gadgets to monumental structures, David Macaulay employs pictures and words to reveal the secret lives of buildings, the wonders of the human body, and the common sense in the design of everyday things. A gifted visual storyteller, he inspires discovery by demystifying the complexities of our world while celebrating the places the imagination takes us when we least expect it.

Transcending the boundaries of time, culture, and geography, David Macaulay’s award-winning books reveal his lifelong love of history, and are beloved by readers throughout the world. A Caldecott Medalist and recipient of a prestigious MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship, he is perhaps best known for his international best seller, The Way Things Work, but his many titles include The Way We Work: Getting to Know the Amazing Human Body, Cathedral, City, Castle, Pyramid, Mill, Underground, Unbuilding, Mosque, and Ship. David’s elegant, whimsical picture books include Rome Antics, Shortcut, and Black and White, the winner of the prestigious Caldecott Medal. His art was the subject of an enthusiastically received exhibition at the Norman Rockwell Museum, titled Building Books: The Art of David Macaulay, which traveled to fourteen museum venues nationwide. David has recently completed a new edition of his classic book, The Way Things Work, reinvented as The Way Things Work Now. In addition, he is in the midst of a new book that tells the story of his emigration from England on the U.S.S. United States—the focus of an upcoming exhibition organized by Norman Rockwell Museum.

Refuge/Amalgam by Frances Jetter, is an illustrated history of her grandfather’s immigration from Poland, his labor union, and his American family in Brooklyn. For the past nine years, Jetter has been working on an artist’s book about her grandfather, who came to America in 1911, and the times in which he lived. “I am interested in telling stories about people and how their lives intersect with history. Amalgam is a pictorial history of my immigrant grandparents and their American family, their old world ways and desire to assimilate, my grandfather’s part in his labor union and the ongoing fight for a living wage.” The artist’s images are made cut from linoleum and are created as 24” x 18” prints. Some have chine collé additions from lithographic or digital prints; more than sixty prints comprise the finished work.

Frances Jetter’s prints, artist’s books, and drawings focus on political and social subject matter. Her images have illustrated articles in publications including the New York Times, The Washington Post, TIME, The Nation, the Village Voice and The Progressive. Her work has been exhibited in the United States, Europe, and Asia. Jetter’s prints are in the permanent collections of the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard, Detroit Institute of Arts, The New York Public Library, and Grinnell College Print and Drawing Study Room, Grinnell, Iowa. Her artist’s books are included in the Library of Congress’ Rare Books and Special Collections, The New York Public Library’s Spencer Collection, and in numerous public and private collections. She received fellowships from New York Foundation for the Arts in the category of Printmaking/Drawing/Artist’s Books in 2003 and in 2011, and a grant from the Puffin Foundation in 2010. ‘Cry Uncle” won the Honorary Mention Award at Pyramid Atlantic Book Arts Fair, Silver Spring, Maryland in 2010. She has taught at the School of Visual Arts since 1979.

Leaving China, a memoir by James McMullan, is inspired by his World War II childhood, and the family’s travels from China to India, Canada, and the United States. “It is this dreamlike quality of my memories that I wanted to capture in some way in the paintings that accompany the text–to suggest in the images that the events occurred a long time ago in a simpler yet more exotic world, and that the players in that world, including me, are at a distance.”

Artist James McMullan’s work has appeared in the pages of virtually every American magazine, on the posters for more than seventy Lincoln Center theater productions, and in bestselling picture books. Now, in a unique memoir comprising more than fifty short essays and illustrations, the artist explores how his early childhood in China and wartime journeys with his mother influenced his whole life, especially his painting and illustration.

James McMullan was born in Tsingtao, North China, in 1934, the grandson of missionaries who settled there. As a little boy, Jim took for granted a privileged life of household servants, rickshaw rides, and picnics on the shore—until World War II erupted and life changed drastically. Jim’s father, a British citizen fluent in several Chinese dialects, joined the Allied forces. For the next several years, Jim and his mother moved from one place to another—Shanghai, San Francisco, Vancouver, Darjeeling—first escaping Japanese occupation then trying to find security, with no clear destination except the unpredictable end of the war. For Jim, those ever-changing years took on the quality of a dream, sometimes a nightmare, a feeling that persists in the stunning full-page, full-color paintings that along with their accompanying text tell the story of Leaving China, which is a Booklist Top 10 Biography for Youth.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

James McMullan

James  McMullan  has  created  images  for  magazine  stories,  books  for  adults and  children,  record  covers,  US  stamps,  murals  and  animated  films  but  he is most  well  known  for  the  over  eighty  posters  he  has  done  for  Lincoln Center Theater.  Among  the  most  recognized  of  these  posters  are  Anything  Goes, Carousel,  South  Pacific,  The  King  and  I  and  My  Fair  Lady.  To  celebrate  this achievement  Lincoln  Center  Theater  has  recently  mounted  a  permanent exhibit  of  his  original  poster  art  in  the  lobby  of  the  Mitzi  Newhouse Theater.

Another  highlight  of  his  career  is  illustrating  the  popular  series  of  vehicle books,  (including  I  Stink!,  a  monologue  by  a  garbage  truck),  written  by  his wife,  the  author,  Kate  McMullan,  which  Amazon  has  transformed  into  the animated  series,  The  Stinky  and  Dirty  Show.

​A  standout  in  James  McMullan’s  work  for  magazines  is  the  group  of journalistic  illustrations  of  a  Brooklyn  Disco  that  he  painted  for  New  York Magazine that  became  the  visual  inspiration  for  the  movie  Saturday  Night Fever.

​James  McMullan’s  long  fascination  with  drawing  the  human  figure  led  him to teach  drawing  for  many  years  at  the  School  of  Visual  Arts  and  to  write High-Focus  Drawing,  which  describes  his  approach  to  understanding  and drawing  the  figure.  In  2011,  at  the  request  of  editors  at  The  New  York Times,  McMullan  created  a  12-part  online  tutorial  on  drawing  that  was  titled, Line  by  Line.

​Along  with  his  illustrated  memoir,  Leaving  China,  his  other  books  are Revealing  Illustrations,  The  Theater  Posters  of  James  McMullan  and  More McMullans.

​James  McMullan’s  art  has  been  exhibited  in  Paris,  Tokyo  and  Shanghai  as well  as  many  museums  and  galleries  in  the  U.S.  In  2011  the  New  York Library  of  Performing  Arts  mounted  an  exhibit,  McMullan  Posters:  Gesture as Design,  and  in  2012  a  retrospective  exhibit  of  his  art  opened  at  the School of  Visual  Arts  Gallery  in  connection  with  Mr. McMullan being elected into the  school’s  Master  Series  Awards.

​A  travelling  exhibit  of  the  original  watercolors  from  his  memoir,  Leaving China,  has  been  mounted  at  the  Society  of  Illustrators  and  the  Century  Club in  New  York  City,  the  Rhode  Island  School  of  Design  and  is  scheduled  for the  Norman  Rockwell  Museum  and  Washington  University  in  2019.

​In  the  December  2017  issue  of  Vanity  Fair,  Mark  Rozzo  writes,  “He  is  to modern-day  New  York  what  Toulouse-Lautrec  was  to  19th-century  Paris.”

David Macaulay

When David Macaulay (b.1946) was a young boy living in Bolton, England, he was fascinated by simple technology. It was not long before he began constructing elevators out of shoe boxes, tape, and string, and devising intricate systems of moving cable cars with empty spools and thread.

He and his family lived at the end of a row of identical brick houses typical of those found in industrial Northern England. At the bottom of the street were woods where young Macaulay spent much of his time playing and exploring—lost in his own imagination. There, he uncovered a wealth of small treasures like animal skeletons and unusual rocks, which he collected and catalogued. If inclement weather kept him indoors, he joined his family in the kitchen, where projects were always underway. “My parents were both makers of things,” the artist has said, “and we were all witness to what they were making—whether my mother was preparing food or sewing or my father was building easels for the local school—it was all done around the kitchen table.” A television was not present in the Macaulay household until he was ten years old.

Employed in the knitting industry, David Macaulay’s father was adept at repairing and improving the function of complex, clamorous textile machinery, and his skills were in high demand. After accepting a manufacturing position in fast-paced Bloomfield, New Jersey, he brought his family to America when David was eleven years old. “Actually, he flew on ahead to find an apartment and buy new furniture. My mother was left with the task of overseeing our five-day transatlantic journey on the S.S. United States. While the view may have been fairly predictable, a different movie was shown every day and it was always free.”

In 1962 the family moved to Rhode Island where Macaulay finished high school. It was during this period that he began to draw seriously. “It was such a great way of showing off.” As senior year began, Macaulay considered his next steps. The artist’s grandfather, a surveyor, had introduced Macaulay to the art of architectural drafting and in the process had kindled an interest in design that lead to his pursuing a career in architecture. He attended the Rhode Island School of Design from 1964 to 1968, and spent his fifth and final year of study in Rome, Italy—a city that he has returned to over and over again, both in life and in art. Though he ultimately decided against a professional career in architecture, his training had served him well, enabling him to navigate complex ideas with confidence.

After graduation, David Macaulay taught briefly on the junior and senior high school level and worked in an interior design office before moving into freelance illustration. In 1973, after two years of experimenting with the creative connections between words and pictures, his first book was published. Cathedral was an immediate success. A Caldecott Medalist and recipient of a prestigious MacArthur Fellows Program “Genius Grant,” he is perhaps best known for his international best seller, The Way Things Work. Readers can transcend the boundaries of time, culture, and geography through City, Castle, Pyramid, Mill, Underground, Unbuilding, Mosque, Ship, and The Way We Work. The artist’s elegant, light-hearted picture books include Rome Antics, Shortcut, and Black and White. He served as the host of Building Big, a PBS miniseries about the world’s greatest feats of engineering and ingenuity, for which he also produced a companion book. He is the recipient of the Norman Rockwell Museum’s 2011/2012 Artist Laureate Award.

Visit artist’s website

Frances Jetter

Since 1975, Frances Jetter’s prints on political and social subject matter have illustrated articles for publications including The New York Times, The Washington Post, Time, The Village Voice, The Nation, and The Progressive. She has illustrated books for the Franklin Library, ads for Audubon, and book jackets for Knopf, Macmillan, and others.

Her work is in the collections of the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University, Detroit Institute of Arts, The New York Public Library Print Collection, and Grinnell College Print and Drawing Study Room in Grinnell, Iowa. Cry Uncle was recently purchased by Plymouth State University’s Lamson Library in Plymouth, New Hampshire. She received a fellowship from New York Foundation for the Arts in 2003 and a grant from the Puffin Foundation in 2010.

Her work has been reviewed by Graphis Magazine (Switzerland), Visual (Barcelona), “Idea,” (Japan), and Design Monthly (Seoul). Awards and annuals include Graphis, Print, the Society of Newspaper Designers, the Society of Illustrators, American Illustration, Communication Arts and Society of Publication Designers.

She is on the Illustrator’s Advisory Board of the Norman Rockwell Museum and has taught at the School of Visual Arts since 1979.

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RELATED EVENTS

Exhibition related events to be determined

MEDIA

Media coverage forthcoming

VENUE(S)

Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, MA      November 10, 2019 through May 25, 2020

RELATED PRODUCTS

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HOURS

Norman Rockwell Museum
is Open 7 days a week year-round

May – October and holidays:
open daily: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Open Thursdays until 7 p.m. through August

Rockwell’s Studio Open:
The studio is currently open through October during regular business hours; and until 7 p.m. on Thursdays through August

Terrace Cafe Open: during regular business hours.
View the menu here…

November – April: open daily:
Weekdays: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Weekends and holidays: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Holiday Closings
The Museum is Closed:

  •    Thanksgiving Day
  •    Christmas Day
  •    New Year’s Day

 

ADMISSIONS

Members: FREE
Kids/Teens 18 and under FREE
Adults $20
Seniors (65+): $18
Veterans: $17
College students with ID: $10
Teachers Current K-12 Public School Teachers from MA, NY, CT, VT with school ID: FREE

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Free admission with SNAP/EBT Card for up to 4 guests per card. LEARN MORE

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Is made possible in part by:
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DIRECTIONS

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA 01262
413-298-4100 x 221

Download a Printable version of Driving Directions (acrobat PDF).

Important note: Many GPS and online maps do not accurately place Norman Rockwell Museum*. Please use the directions provided here and this map image for reference. Google Maps & Directions are correct! http://maps.google.com/

* Please help us inform the mapping service companies that incorrectly locate the Museum; let your GPS or online provider know and/or advise our Visitor Services office which source provided faulty directions.

Route 7 runs north to south through the Berkshires. Follow Route 7 South to Stockbridge. Turn right onto Route 102 West and follow through Main Street Stockbridge. Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

Route 7 runs north to south through the Berkshires. Follow Route 7 North into Stockbridge. Turn left onto Route 102 West at the stop sign next to The Red Lion Inn. Shortly after you make the left turn, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

Boston (two-and-a-half hours) or Springfield (one hour):
Take the Ma ssachusetts Turnpike (I-90) West, getting off at exit 2 – Lee. At the light at the end of the ramp turn left onto Route 20 East and then immediately turn right onto Route 102 West. Follow Route 102 West into Stockbridge Center (about five miles). Continue going west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

from Albany and west: (one hour) Take I-90 east to exit B3 – Route 22. Go south on New York Route 22 to Massachusetts Route 102 East. Stay on Route 102 East through West Stockbridge. Continue on Route 102 East approximately 5.5 miles until you come to a blinking light at the intersection of Route 183. Make a right at the blinking light onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(two-and-a-half hours) Take either the New York State Thruway or the Taconic State Parkway to I-90 East. Follow I-90 East to exit B3 – Route 22. Go south on New York Route 22 to Massachusetts Route 102 East. Stay on Route 102 East through West Stockbridge. Continue on Route 102 East approximately 5.5 miles until you come to a blinking light at the intersection of Route 183. Make a right at the blinking light onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(one-and-a-half hours) Take I-91 North to the Massachusetts Turnpike. Take the Massachusetts Turnpike (I-90) West, getting off at exit 2 – Lee. At the light at the end of the ramp turn left onto Route 20 East and then immediately turn right onto Route 102 West. Follow Route 102 West into Stockbridge Center (about five miles). Continue going west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(five minutes)
Go west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.