JAMES WARHOLA: UNCLE ANDY AND OTHER STORIES

June 10, 2017 through October 29, 2017

“Though my inspiration and encouragement to be an artist came from Uncle Andy, I am more connected to Norman Rockwell in substance and style. While I was growing up, Rockwell was ubiquitous to me. I could not help but be excited by his wonderful narrative images.”

—James Warhola

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, illustrator James Warhola was influenced as a child by his artistic family—especially his famous uncle, Pop artist-Andy Warhol. From an early age, he watched his uncle create illustrations for shoes, shopping bags, and advertisements, which piqued his interest in the world of art.

Like Andy Warhol, Warhola attended Tam O’Shanter’s Saturday Art Classes at the Carnegie Museum of Art, and graduated from Carnegie Mellon University. A move to New York City brought him to the Art Students League, where he refined his painting skills and set out to establish a career as a freelance illustrator. First specializing in science fiction and fantasy illustration, Warhola has since created artworks for more than three-hundred-fifty book jackets, including Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein and Neuromancer by William Gibson. In 1987, he accepted his first of thirty-five children’s book commissions, a path that offered new opportunities for expression. Warhola been a regular contributor to Mad magazine since 1980, and has been a primary illustrator for the popular Garbage Pail Kids card series.

This special compendium exhibition to Inventing America: Rockwell and Warhol explores Warhola’s outstanding career as a science fiction, fantasy, and children’s book artist, including original illustrations for his acclaimed picture books, Uncle Andy’s: A Faabbbulous Visit with Andy Warhol, and Uncle Andy’s Cats, which document his memorable family gatherings.

James Warhola was one of seven children born to Paul and Ana in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His father was the older brother of famed Pop artist-Andy Warhol. From an early age, Warhola watched his uncle create illustrations for shoes, shopping bags, and advertisements, which piqued his interest in the world of art.

Like Andy Warhol, Warhola attended Tam O’Shanter’s Saturday Art Classes at the Carnegie Museum of Art, and graduated from Carnegie Mellon University with a BFA in design. In 1977, he moved to New York City and attended to the Art Students League, where Norman Rockwell and so many other noted artists found inspiration. There, he refined his painting skills, and with a focus on comics, science fiction, and fantasy illustration, found work as a freelance illustrator and designer. Warhola has created artworks for more than three hundred book jackets, including Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein and Neuromancer by William Gibson. In addition, he has been a regular contributor for Mad magazine since 1980, creating both cover and story illustrations, and one of the primary artists for the popular Garbage Pail Kids trading card series.

In 1987, he began to illustrate children’s books, including The Pumpkinville Mystery, Eddie: Harold’s Younger Brother, The Tinderbox, and The Brave Little Tailor.  In 2004, Warhola won the International Reading Association’s Award for Best Children’s Non-Fiction Picture Book for his book Uncle Andy’s: A Faabbbulous Visit with Andy Warhol, a recount of family trip to New York City to see his uncle and grandmother. In 2009, he wrote and illustrated the sequel Uncle Andy’s: Uncle Andy’s Cats.

“My first memories of Andy were of him as a very busy illustrator, with a different name than ours,” Warhola recalls. “Oh, about the name change from Warhola to Warhol, which is something I’m often asked about. He dropped the ‘a’ simply because it was easier to pronounce, not because he knocked the ‘a’ off trying to hit a roach coming out of his portfolio while on his first interview—a story that my father liked to tell.”

James Warhola resides in Tivoli, New York. Warhola continues to illustrate children’s books today.

IMAGES

James Warhola at home in his studio
James Warhola at home in his studio
Warhola, James - Uncle Andy's Cats
James Warhola, Uncle Andy’s Cats, 2008. Cover illustration for Uncle Andy’s Cats, 2008. Watercolor and ink on paper, 11 ½” x 14 ½”. ©James Warhola. All rights reserved.
James Warhola at home in his studio
Uncle Andy, We’re Here! Illustration for Uncle Andy’s: A Faabbbulous Visit with Andy Warhol by James Warhola, Picture Puffin Books Watercolor and pencil on paper Collection of the artist
James Warhola at home in his studio
Jamie Drawing in the Junkyard, 2002 James Warhola
James Warhola at home in his studio
Stranger in a Strange Land 1997 Cover illustration for Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein Oil on canvas board Collection of the artist
James Warhola at home in his studio
Mona “GPK” Lisa n.d. Illustration for Garbage Pail Kids Trading Cards Watercolor and ink on paper. Collection of the artist
James Warhola at home in his studio
Illustration for Uncle Andy’s: A Faabbbulous Visit with Andy Warhol
by James Warhola, Picture Puffin Books. Watercolor and pencil on paper. Collection of the artist
James Warhola at home in his studio
Son of Mad Sucks (Alfred E. Neuman as a Vampire) 1980
Cover illustration Son of Mad Sucks, MAD magazine Trading card illustration, James Warhola Fantasy Art Trading Cards Set
Oil on masonite. Collection of the artist
James Warhola at home in his studio
Homunculus 1982 Cover illustration Homunculus
by James P. Blaylock Oil on masonite Collection of the artist

Be sure to explore many more works from
James Warhola: Uncle Andy and Other Stories in our digital audio tour…logon to:

discover.nrm.org

RELATED EVENTS

There are no upcoming events at this time.

MEDIA

Uncle Andy’s Cats and Other Pet Stories with James Warhola

VENUE(S)

Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, MA      June 10, 2017 through October 29, 2017

HOURS

Norman Rockwell Museum
is Open 7 days a week year-round

May – October and holidays:
open daily: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Rockwell's Studio Open:
May 1 through November 5, 2017

November – April: open daily:
Weekdays: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Weekends and holidays: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Holiday Closings
The Museum is Closed:

  •    Thanksgiving Day
  •    Christmas Day
  •    New Year's Day

ADMISSION

Members: FREE
Kids 18 and under FREE
Adults $20
Seniors (65+): $18
Veterans: $17
College students with ID: $10

Museums for All
Free admission with SNAP/EBT Card for up to 4 guests per card. LEARN MORE

Blue Star Families
Active Military / Blue Star Program
Free admission with ID. LEARN MORE

DIRECTIONS

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA 01262
413-298-4100 x 221

Download a Printable version of Driving Directions (acrobat PDF).

Important note: Many GPS and online maps do not accurately place Norman Rockwell Museum*. Please use the directions provided here and this map image for reference. Google Maps & Directions are correct! http://maps.google.com/

* Please help us inform the mapping service companies that incorrectly locate the Museum; let your GPS or online provider know and/or advise our Visitor Services office which source provided faulty directions.

Route 7 runs north to south through the Berkshires. Follow Route 7 South to Stockbridge. Turn right onto Route 102 West and follow through Main Street Stockbridge. Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

Route 7 runs north to south through the Berkshires. Follow Route 7 North into Stockbridge. Turn left onto Route 102 West at the stop sign next to The Red Lion Inn. Shortly after you make the left turn, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

Boston (two-and-a-half hours) or Springfield (one hour):
Take the Ma ssachusetts Turnpike (I-90) West, getting off at exit 2 – Lee. At the light at the end of the ramp turn left onto Route 20 East and then immediately turn right onto Route 102 West. Follow Route 102 West into Stockbridge Center (about five miles). Continue going west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

from Albany and west: (one hour) Take I-90 east to exit B3 – Route 22. Go south on New York Route 22 to Massachusetts Route 102 East. Stay on Route 102 East through West Stockbridge. Continue on Route 102 East approximately 5.5 miles until you come to a blinking light at the intersection of Route 183. Make a right at the blinking light onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(two-and-a-half hours) Take either the New York State Thruway or the Taconic State Parkway to I-90 East. Follow I-90 East to exit B3 – Route 22. Go south on New York Route 22 to Massachusetts Route 102 East. Stay on Route 102 East through West Stockbridge. Continue on Route 102 East approximately 5.5 miles until you come to a blinking light at the intersection of Route 183. Make a right at the blinking light onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(one-and-a-half hours) Take I-91 North to the Massachusetts Turnpike. Take the Massachusetts Turnpike (I-90) West, getting off at exit 2 – Lee. At the light at the end of the ramp turn left onto Route 20 East and then immediately turn right onto Route 102 West. Follow Route 102 West into Stockbridge Center (about five miles). Continue going west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(five minutes)
Go west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

2017-07-19T12:12:39+00:00