Changing Times: Norman Rockwell’s Art for Look Magazine

The Problem We All Live With
Norman Rockwell (1894-1978), “The Problem We All Live With,” 1963. Oil on canvas, 36 x 58”. Story illustration for “Look,” January 14, 1964. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections. ©Norman Rockwell Family Agency. All rights reserved.

CURRENTLY ON VIEW

In the 1960’s, leaving behind his beloved story-telling scenes, Norman Rockwell threw himself into a new genre—the visual documentation of social issues. He had always wanted to make a difference with his art, and as a highly marketable illustrator, he had the opportunity to do so. Humor and pathos—traits that made his Saturday Evening Post covers successful— were replaced by a direct, pared down, reportorial style more appropriate for magazine editorials.

After ending his forty-seven year career with The Post, in 1963, Rockwell sought new artistic challenges. His first assignment for LookThe Problem We All Live With—portrayed a six-year-old African-American girl being escorted by four U.S. marshals to her first day at an all-white school in New Orleans, a gentle assertion on moral decency. In 1965, Rockwell focused on the murder of three civil rights workers in Philadelphia, Mississippi, and in 1967, he chose children, once again, to illustrate desegregation, this time in our nation’s suburbs. In the years that followed, Rockwell reported on the space race, depicting the moon landing before and after it happened, and he painted portraits of the most prominent political candidates of his time. In an interview later in his life, Rockwell recalled that he once had to paint out an African-American person in a group picture since The Post’s policy dictated showing people of color in service industry jobs only. Freed from such restraints, Rockwell seemed to look for opportunities to correct the
editorial prejudices reflected in his previous work.

A bi-weekly magazine, Look was published from 1937 to 1971, reaching its peak circulation in 1969 with 7.7 million readers per issue. Of the leading general interest magazines, Look had a circulation second only to Life, but it outsold The Saturday Evening Post, which stopped its presses in 1969. Despite its popularity, Look, like many other American magazines of the mid-twentieth century, suffered advertising revenue losses as corporations moved to feature their products on the newer medium of television. At the time, a slack economy and rising postal rates also conspired to make print publications like Look an endangered species.

ABOUT NORMAN ROCKWELL

Born in New York City in 1894, Norman Rockwell always wanted to be an artist. At age 14, Rockwell enrolled in art classes at The New York School of Art (formerly The Chase School of Art). Two years later, in 1910, he left high school to study art at The National Academy of Design. He soon transferred to The Art Students League, where he studied with Thomas Fogarty and George Bridgman. Fogarty’s instruction in illustration prepared Rockwell for his first commercial commissions. From Bridgman, Rockwell learned the technical skills on which he relied throughout his long career.

Rockwell found success early. He painted his first commission of four Christmas cards before his sixteenth birthday. While still in his teens, he was hired as art director of Boys’ Life, the official publication of the Boy Scouts of America, and began a successful freelance career illustrating a variety of young people’s publications.

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IMAGES

Gallery Photograph of Changing Times: Norman Rockwell’s Art for Look Magazine

Gallery Photograph of Changing Times: Norman Rockwell’s Art for Look Magazine

Gallery Photograph of Changing Times: Norman Rockwell’s Art for Look Magazine

RELATED EVENTS

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MEDIA

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VENUE(S)

Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, MA   –   Currently on View

HOURS

Norman Rockwell Museum
is Open 7 days a week year-round

November – April: open daily:
Weekdays: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Weekends and holidays: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Rockwell's Studio Open:
May 1 through November 12, 2017 (currently closed)

May – October and holidays:
open daily: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Holiday Closings
The Museum is Closed:

  •    Thanksgiving Day
  •    Christmas Day
  •    New Year's Day

ADMISSION

Members: FREE
Kids 18 and under FREE
Adults $20
Seniors (65+): $18
Veterans: $17
College students with ID: $10

Museums for All
Free admission with SNAP/EBT Card for up to 4 guests per card. LEARN MORE

Blue Star Families
Active Military / Blue Star Program
Free admission with ID. LEARN MORE

KIDS FREE!
Is made possible in part by:
Blue Star Families

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DIRECTIONS

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA 01262
413-298-4100 x 221

Download a Printable version of Driving Directions (acrobat PDF).

Important note: Many GPS and online maps do not accurately place Norman Rockwell Museum*. Please use the directions provided here and this map image for reference. Google Maps & Directions are correct! http://maps.google.com/

* Please help us inform the mapping service companies that incorrectly locate the Museum; let your GPS or online provider know and/or advise our Visitor Services office which source provided faulty directions.

Route 7 runs north to south through the Berkshires. Follow Route 7 South to Stockbridge. Turn right onto Route 102 West and follow through Main Street Stockbridge. Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

Route 7 runs north to south through the Berkshires. Follow Route 7 North into Stockbridge. Turn left onto Route 102 West at the stop sign next to The Red Lion Inn. Shortly after you make the left turn, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

Boston (two-and-a-half hours) or Springfield (one hour):
Take the Ma ssachusetts Turnpike (I-90) West, getting off at exit 2 – Lee. At the light at the end of the ramp turn left onto Route 20 East and then immediately turn right onto Route 102 West. Follow Route 102 West into Stockbridge Center (about five miles). Continue going west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

from Albany and west: (one hour) Take I-90 east to exit B3 – Route 22. Go south on New York Route 22 to Massachusetts Route 102 East. Stay on Route 102 East through West Stockbridge. Continue on Route 102 East approximately 5.5 miles until you come to a blinking light at the intersection of Route 183. Make a right at the blinking light onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(two-and-a-half hours) Take either the New York State Thruway or the Taconic State Parkway to I-90 East. Follow I-90 East to exit B3 – Route 22. Go south on New York Route 22 to Massachusetts Route 102 East. Stay on Route 102 East through West Stockbridge. Continue on Route 102 East approximately 5.5 miles until you come to a blinking light at the intersection of Route 183. Make a right at the blinking light onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(one-and-a-half hours) Take I-91 North to the Massachusetts Turnpike. Take the Massachusetts Turnpike (I-90) West, getting off at exit 2 – Lee. At the light at the end of the ramp turn left onto Route 20 East and then immediately turn right onto Route 102 West. Follow Route 102 West into Stockbridge Center (about five miles). Continue going west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(five minutes)
Go west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

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