Woodstock to the Moon: 1969 Illustrated

June 8 through October 27, 2019

In celebration of Norman Rockwell Museum’s 50th Anniversary, we look back at the many ways illustrators portrayed news events and reflected popular culture in 1969.  Norman Rockwell’s own work reflected the changing times with his iconic depiction of the moon landing, an album cover he painted for rock musicians, and a tribute to the final issue of The Saturday Evening Post.  Following one of the darkest years in post-War America, in which Martin Luther King, Jr. was slain, a presidential hopeful was assassinated, the U.S. military faced setbacks in the war in Vietnam with the Tet Offensive and the My Lai Massacre, and college students led campus protests, the events of 1969 symbolized a time of hope and contrasts.

The year began when a new president was inaugurated, promising to bring troops home from Vietnam.  A “small step for a man” on the moon was followed by a gathering of 400,000 concertgoers reveling in “three days of peace and music” at Woodstock.  The exhibition will include the famous concert poster as well as other inventive and psychedelic art as depicted in album covers and posters of bands such as Led Zeppelin, The Who, and the Grateful Dead.

Arnold Skolnick, Concert poster for the Woodstock festival, August 1969. ‘WOODSTOCK’ and the Dove & Guitar Logo are registered trademarks of Woodstock Ventures LC and are used under license.

Children experienced illustration through animation in the revolutionary new children’s television series, Sesame Street, and in Saturday morning cartoons with a dog named Scooby-Doo.  Eric Carle and William Steig produced their award-winning children’s books, The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Sylvester and the Magic Pebble, while Frank Frazetta, Jack Gaughan, Jeff Jones, and others gained fame painting popular science fiction book covers.

The magazine National Lampoon was founded, providing a satirical view of current events for a new generation of readers.  Created by writers and comedians who would go on to create Saturday Night Live and classic films such as Animal House, Caddyshack, and Vacation, the magazine relied heavily on illustrations by Edward Gorey, Boris Vallejo, R.O. Blechman, Roz Chast, Gahan Wilson, Neal Adams, and others.

This exhibition will combine original illustrations with vintage archival material to transport you to a groovier era.  An additional gallery will revisit the early days of Norman Rockwell Museum, from its humble beginnings when it opened its doors at The Corner House in Stockbridge in May 1969 through its expansion into a vital center which informs the public of Norman Rockwell’s life and career, while showcasing the rich history of American illustration.

Major sponsors: Dena M. Hardymon; Brenda and Jeffrey Bleustein;
Audrey and Ralph Friedner
and TD Bank

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Artists include: Arnold Skolnick, Randy Tuten, D. Bread, Greg Irons, Eric Carle, William Steig, Frank Frazetta and Norman Rockwell among many others. More information forthcoming.

IMAGES

Art Critic

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978), Portrait of John F. Kennedy, 1960. Oil on canvas, 16″ x 12″. Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, November 5, 1960. From the permanent collection of Norman Rockwell Museum. ©1960 SEPS: Licensed by Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN

Art Critic

The New Hat, 1969. Norman Rockwell (b.1894, d.1978) Top Value Stamps: gift catalogue cover. Norman Rockwell Museum Collection. ©Norman Rockwell Family Agency

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Portrait of Mike Bloomfield and Al Kooper, 1968. Norman Rockwell (b.1894, d.1978). Columbia Records: record album cover. Norman Rockwell Museum Collection. ©Columbia Records

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Neil Armstrong, Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. walks on the surface of the moon, July 20, 1969. Courtesy of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

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Greg Irons, Concert poster for Procol Harum at Fillmore West, April 3, 1969. Bill Graham Archives, © Wolfgangs, All Rights Reserved

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Randy Tuten, Concert poster for The Byrds at Fillmore West, June 12, 1969. Bill Graham Archives, © Wolfgangs, All Rights Reserved

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Greg Irons, Concert poster for Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young at Winterland and Fillmore West, October 2, 1969. Bill Graham Archives, © Wolfgangs, All Rights Reserved

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D. Bread and Randy Tuten, Concert poster for Janis Joplin at Winterland and Fillmore West, March 20, 1969. Bill Graham Archives, © Wolfgangs, All Rights Reserved

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Neil Armstrong, Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. poses for a photograph beside the United States flag on the lunar surface, July 20, 1969. Courtesy of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

RELATED EVENTS

Jul 13

Artist Talk & Booksigning

July 13 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

MEDIA

VENUE(S)

Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, MA      June 8 through October 27, 2019

RELATED PRODUCTS

There are currently no related products for this exhibition, check back soon!

HOURS

Norman Rockwell Museum
is Open 7 days a week year-round

May – October and holidays:
open daily: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Rockwell’s Studio Open:
The studio is currently open through October
during regular business hours.

Terrace Cafe Open: during regular business hours.
View the menu here…

November – April: open daily:
Weekdays: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Weekends and holidays: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Holiday Closings
The Museum is Closed:

  •    Thanksgiving Day
  •    Christmas Day
  •    New Year’s Day

 

ADMISSIONS

Members: FREE
Kids/Teens 18 and under FREE
Adults $20
Seniors (65+): $18
Veterans: $17
College students with ID: $10
Teachers Current K-12 Public School Teachers from MA, NY, CT, VT with school ID: FREE

Museums for All
Free admission with SNAP/EBT Card for up to 4 guests per card. LEARN MORE

Active Military / Blue Star Program
Free admission with ID. LEARN MORE

KIDS FREE!
Is made possible in part by:
Blue Star Families

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DIRECTIONS

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA 01262
413-298-4100 x 221

Download a Printable version of Driving Directions (acrobat PDF).

Important note: Many GPS and online maps do not accurately place Norman Rockwell Museum*. Please use the directions provided here and this map image for reference. Google Maps & Directions are correct! http://maps.google.com/

* Please help us inform the mapping service companies that incorrectly locate the Museum; let your GPS or online provider know and/or advise our Visitor Services office which source provided faulty directions.

Route 7 runs north to south through the Berkshires. Follow Route 7 South to Stockbridge. Turn right onto Route 102 West and follow through Main Street Stockbridge. Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

Route 7 runs north to south through the Berkshires. Follow Route 7 North into Stockbridge. Turn left onto Route 102 West at the stop sign next to The Red Lion Inn. Shortly after you make the left turn, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

Boston (two-and-a-half hours) or Springfield (one hour):
Take the Ma ssachusetts Turnpike (I-90) West, getting off at exit 2 – Lee. At the light at the end of the ramp turn left onto Route 20 East and then immediately turn right onto Route 102 West. Follow Route 102 West into Stockbridge Center (about five miles). Continue going west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

from Albany and west: (one hour) Take I-90 east to exit B3 – Route 22. Go south on New York Route 22 to Massachusetts Route 102 East. Stay on Route 102 East through West Stockbridge. Continue on Route 102 East approximately 5.5 miles until you come to a blinking light at the intersection of Route 183. Make a right at the blinking light onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(two-and-a-half hours) Take either the New York State Thruway or the Taconic State Parkway to I-90 East. Follow I-90 East to exit B3 – Route 22. Go south on New York Route 22 to Massachusetts Route 102 East. Stay on Route 102 East through West Stockbridge. Continue on Route 102 East approximately 5.5 miles until you come to a blinking light at the intersection of Route 183. Make a right at the blinking light onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(one-and-a-half hours) Take I-91 North to the Massachusetts Turnpike. Take the Massachusetts Turnpike (I-90) West, getting off at exit 2 – Lee. At the light at the end of the ramp turn left onto Route 20 East and then immediately turn right onto Route 102 West. Follow Route 102 West into Stockbridge Center (about five miles). Continue going west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.

(five minutes)
Go west on Route 102 (Main St.). Shortly after going through town, you will veer to the right to stay on Route 102 West for approximately 1.8 miles. At the flashing light, make a left onto Route 183 South and the Museum entrance is 0.6 miles down on the left.