Norman Rockwell Museum Presents Creative Cartooning with Scott Lincoln

Scott Lincoln, NRM cartooning class

Photo of cartoonist Scott Lincoln teaching an animation class at Norman Rockwell Museum. Photo ©Norman Rockwell Museum. All rights reserved.

Stockbridge, MA, May 21, 2015—In conjunction with its new exhibition, Roz Chast: Cartoon Memoirs, Norman Rockwell Museum will present Creative Cartooning, a weeklong art workshop for children and young adults, to be held Monday, July 13 through 17, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Illustrator and animator Scott Lincoln will show participants how to develop their own cartoons, by learning the techniques of character design, storyboarding, and sequential image making in order to create a unique, visual narrative. Students should bring their own lunch; art materials will be provided. Admission for ages 10 and up costs $175; $150 for Museum members. An extended program will also be offered daily from 3 to 5 p.m. for an additional $50 a week. Pre-registration is required by contacting the Museum at 413.931.2221 or programs@nrm.org.

Scott Lincoln is the creator of Ralf the Destroyer, a long-running cartoon strip, and has taught aspiring artists at the Guy Gilchrist Cartoon Academy. Scott Lincoln began his career at the age of 15, publishing the comic strip Kabloona in local papers. He spent seven years assisting on the syndicated strip Nancy and distributed his own feature Solomon Road with DBR Media. His graphic novel Ghost House was published in 2009 by Rubicon Publishing. View his work at ralfthedestroyer.com.
Roz Chast: Cartoon Memoirs
On view through October 26, 2015

Over the past 37 years, readers of The New Yorker have been enjoying cartoonist Roz Chast’s signature style and wit. From her timelessly funny cartoons and lively children’s picture books, to her intricately-painted pysanka eggs and hand-made textiles, Roz Chast: Cartoon Memoirs will feature works representing the breadth of Chast’s entire artistic career. A highlight of the exhibition will be nearly 120 original drawings from her award-winning memoir, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? which tackles the sensitive subject of caring for the elderly, with thoughtful insight and humor.

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