Norman Rockwell (1894-1978), "Portrait of Dwight D. Eisenhower," 1952. Story illustration for "The Day I Painted Ike," by Norman Rockwell. "The Saturday Evening Post," October 11, 1952. Oil on board. Private collection. ©SEPS: Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN

Norman Rockwell (1894-1978), “Portrait of Dwight D. Eisenhower,” 1952. Story illustration for “The Day I Painted Ike,” by Norman Rockwell. “The Saturday Evening Post,” October 11, 1952. Oil on board. Private collection. ©SEPS: Curtis Publishing, Indianapolis, IN

Of the few politicians that Norman Rockwell openly expressed an opinion of, his genial view of Dwight D. Eisenhower was perhaps the most well-known. Shortly after Eisenhower received the GOP nomination, The Saturday Evening Post flew Rockwell from Vermont to Denver with less than a day’s notice to capture the General’s portrait. The end result was a cover and a three-page article illustrated and written by Rockwell about his meeting with Eisenhower, which essentially served as a personal endorsement of the future president; he even referred to himself in the last sentence as an “Eisenhower worshipper.” Ben Hibbs, then editor of the Post, wrote to Rockwell saying “If Ike is elected, as I think he will be, no small share of the credit should go to Norman Rockwell.”

About Face: Norman Rockwell’s Portraits is now on view at Norman Rockwell Museum. 

Like Ike? Find a collection of this and other Presidential portraits in the Norman Rockwell Museum store.

2017-03-01T11:39:49+00:00