Photo of Norman and Molly Rockwell, and friend Doug McGregor. Photo by Louie Lamone, 1971. Norman Rockwell Museum Digital Collections. ©NRELC: Niles, IL.
Photo of Norman and Molly Rockwell, and friend Doug McGregor. Photo by Louie Lamone, 1971. Norman Rockwell Museum Digital Collections. ©NRELC: Niles, IL.

It’s a rainy start to the week here in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, but a perfect time to come inside and view some inspiring illustration artwork here at Norman Rockwell Museum.

Take a trip back in time to visit Norman Rockwell’s original Stockbridge studio, located right here on our grounds. The studio has been reinstalled to look as it did circa 1960, when the artist was working on his iconic painting, The Golden Rule. For a preview, download our interactive studio app in the Google Play Store.

If you prefer a more old-school approach to tweeting, you might enjoy our exhibition of Rockwell’s original artwork created for the children’s book Willie Was Different. Originally published in 1967, Willie Was Different tells the story of a wood thrush with a magical gift for music, who is befriended by the kind Miss Polly. Beautifully illustrated, it’s a charming story about the trials of genius and the satisfactions of true friendship.

Also on display, don’t miss Everett Raymond Kinstler: Pulps to Portraits (on view through May 28, 2012), Curator’s Choice: Recent Gifts to the Permanent Collection, and Norman Rockwell’s 323 “Saturday Evening Post” Covers.

"Springtime in Stockbridge," Norman Rockwell, 1971. Oil on canvas, 32” x 68”. Story illustration for "Look," June 1, 1971. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections. ©NRELC: Niles, IL

"Springtime in Stockbridge," Norman Rockwell, 1971. Oil on canvas, 32” x 68”. Story illustration for "Look," June 1, 1971. Norman Rockwell Museum Collections. ©NRELC: Niles, IL

Many of Rockwell’s most memorable Saturday Evening Post covers were created right here in Stockbridge, where he lived from 1953 to 1978. This Saturday, May 19, take a tour of the artist’s life and art in the town with a springtime guided tour from Museum educators Melinda Georgeson and Tom Daly. Look for Rockwell’s old studio, his home near the Red Lion Inn, and the locations that inspired such classic paintings as The Marriage License and Stockbridge Main Street at Christmas. The tour will meet in front of the Stockbridge Library and Museum, near the original location for Norman Rockwell Museum. The tour costs $12, $8 members.

This Friday, May 18, Norman Rockwell Museum will take part in Art Museum Day, offering $5 off adult admission, $5 off a family/dual members (and above), and $5 off a Museum Store purchase of $50 or more. In addition, the Museum will offer three free gallery tours: at 11 a.m., 12:30 and 2 p.m., as well as tours of Rockwell’s studio throughout the day.

Looking ahead: save thee date for our Swagger & Dagger dance party, being held to celebrate the opening of Howard Pyle: American Master Rediscoveredon Saturday, June 9. Considered the grandfather of American illustration, Howard Pyle (1853-1911) was a hero to Norman Rockwell, and known for his beautiful artworks, which included adventurous illustrations of pirates. Dress to impress with your finest pirate garments or festive attire, and get down to the sounds of the Berkshire Bateria. A cocktail buffet and raw bar will also be served, along with a special pirate treasure auction to benefit Norman Rockwell Museum. For more information, visit our Pyle exhibition mini-site.

Plenty of art adventures await at Norman Rockwell Museum—we look forward to seeing you soon.

 

2017-03-01T11:40:59+00:00